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Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;65(12):1402-8. doi: 10.1001/archpsyc.65.12.1402.

Mental disorders, quality of care, and outcomes among older patients hospitalized with heart failure: an analysis of the national heart failure project.

Author information

  • 1Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, Rm IE-61 Sterling Hall of Medicine, 333 Cedar St, PO Box 208025, New Haven, CT 06520-8025, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effect of a mental illness diagnosis on quality of care and outcomes among patients with heart failure.

DESIGN:

Retrospective, national, population-based sample of patients with heart failure hospitalized from April 1, 1998, through March 31, 1999, and July 1, 2000, through June 30, 2001.

SETTING:

Nonfederal US acute care hospitals.

PATIENTS:

A total of 53 314 Medicare beneficiaries.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Quality of care measures, including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) assessment, prescription of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor at discharge among patients without treatment contraindications, and 1-year readmission and 1-year mortality.

RESULTS:

Of the patients included in the study, 17.0% had a mental illness diagnosis. Compared with patients without mental illness diagnoses, eligible patients with mental illness diagnoses had lower rates of LVEF evaluation (53.0% vs 47.3%; P < .001) but comparable rates of ACE inhibitor prescription (71.3% vs 69.7%; P = .40). Findings were unchanged after multivariate adjustment: patients with mental illness had lower odds of LVEF evaluation (odds ratio [OR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.87) but comparable rates of ACE inhibitor prescription (0.96; 0.80-1.14). Patients with mental illness diagnoses had higher crude rates of 1-year all-cause readmission (73.7% vs 68.5%; P < .001), which persisted after multivariate adjustment (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.21-1.39). Crude 1-year mortality was higher among patients with a mental illness diagnosis (41.0% vs 36.2%; P < .001). Presence of a comorbid mental illness diagnosis was associated with 1-year mortality after multivariate adjustment (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.12-1.28).

CONCLUSIONS:

Mental illness is commonly diagnosed among elderly patients hospitalized with heart failure. This subgroup receives somewhat poorer care during hospitalization and has a greater risk of death and readmission to the hospital.

PMID:
19047527
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2790277
Free PMC Article
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