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Oncogene. 2009 Feb 5;28(5):742-51. doi: 10.1038/onc.2008.430. Epub 2008 Dec 1.

In vitro and in vivo analysis of B-Myb in basal-like breast cancer.

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  • 1Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Abstract

A defining feature of basal-like breast cancer, a breast cancer subtype with poor clinical prognosis, is the high expression of 'proliferation signature' genes. We identified B-Myb, a MYB family transcription factor that is often amplified and overexpressed in many tumor types, as being highly expressed in the proliferation signature. However, the roles of B-Myb in disease progression, and its mammary-specific transcriptional targets, are poorly understood. Here, we showed that B-Myb expression is a significant predictor of survival and pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. We also identified a significant association between the G/G genotype of a nonsynonymous B-Myb germline variant (rs2070235, S427G) and an increased risk of basal-like breast cancer [OR 2.0, 95% CI (1.1-3.8)]. In immortalized, human mammary epithelial cell lines, but not in basal-like tumor lines, cells ectopically expressing wild-type B-Myb or the S427G variant showed increased sensitivity to two DNA topoisomerase IIalpha inhibitors, but not to other chemotherapeutics. In addition, microarray analyses identified many G2/M genes as being induced in B-Myb overexpressing cells. These results confirm that B-Myb is involved in cell cycle control, and that its dysregulation may contribute to increased sensitivity to a specific class of chemotherapeutic agents. These data provide insight into the influence of B-Myb in human breast cancer, which is of potential clinical importance for determining disease risk and for guiding treatment.

PMID:
19043454
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2636852
Free PMC Article
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