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J Affect Disord. 2009 Jul;116(1-2):37-42. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2008.10.023. Epub 2008 Nov 25.

Neurocognitive and symptomatic predictors of functional outcome in bipolar disorders: a prospective 1 year follow-up study.

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  • 1Bipolor Disorder Program, Neurosciences Institute, Favaloro Foundation, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to estimate the predictive value of cognitive impairments and time spent ill in long-term functional outcome of patients with bipolar disorder (BD).

METHODS:

Thirty five patients with euthymic BD completed a neurocognitive battery to assess verbal memory, attention, and executive functions at study entry. The course of illness was documented prospectively for a period longer than 12 months using a modified life charting technique based on the NIMH life-charting method. Psychosocial functioning was assessed with the General Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and the Functioning Assessment Short Test (FAST) at the end of follow-up period when patients were euthymic.

RESULTS:

Impairments in verbal memory and in attention, as well as subsyndromal depressive symptomatology were independent predictors of GAF score at the end of the study explaining 43% of variance. Similarly, impairments in attention and executive functioning were independent predictors of FAST score explaining 28% of variance.

LIMITATIONS:

We did not control factors that could affect functional outcome such as psychosocial interventions, familiar support and housing and financial resources.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both cognitive impairments and time spent with subsyndromal depressive symptomatology may be illness features associated with poorer long-term functional outcome. Developing strategies to treat these illness features might contribute to enhance long-term functional outcome among patients with BD.

PMID:
19033081
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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