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J Pediatr. 2009 Apr;154(4):578-81. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2008.10.007. Epub 2008 Nov 20.

Safety of frequent venous blood sampling in a pediatric research population.

Author information

  • 1Harvard Reproductive Sciences Center and Reproductive Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. sbroder-finger@partners.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To monitor hematological indices in otherwise healthy children with central precocious puberty who underwent frequent venous sampling as part of a longitudinal clinical research study.

STUDY DESIGN:

Thirty-four female subjects underwent frequent venous sampling (every 10-20 minutes for 8-16 hours) every 6 months for >or=3 years during and after their treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue. Hemoglobin (Hgb), mean corpuscular volume, and ferritin levels were measured before and after each phlebotomy session.

RESULTS:

At baseline, the average Hgb level was 12.5+/-0.7 g/L. At the conclusion of the first sampling session, the Hgb level fell 1.2+/-0.1 g/L, remaining within the reference range for age. At the 3-month follow-up, there was complete recovery of Hgb (12.6+/-0.2 g/L). Longitudinal evaluation every 6 months for as long as 3 years showed no significant differences in Hgb, mean corpuscular volume, or ferritin levels from baseline. No clinically significant adverse effects attributable to phlebotomy were reported.

CONCLUSION:

When appropriate safety guidelines were followed, both acute and long-term frequent venous sampling in a pediatric population was safe. Guidelines include monitoring of hematological indices, phlebotomy volume <10 mL/kg/24 hours, and iron replacement.

PMID:
19026428
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2694723
Free PMC Article

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