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Magn Reson Med. 2008 Dec;60(6):1433-43. doi: 10.1002/mrm.21771.

Quantitative bone matrix density measurement by water- and fat-suppressed proton projection MRI (WASPI) with polymer calibration phantoms.

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  • 1Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

The density of the organic matrix of bone substance is a critical parameter necessary to clinically evaluate and distinguish structural and metabolic pathological conditions such as osteomalacia in adults and rickets in growing children. Water- and fat-suppressed proton projection MRI (WASPI) was developed as a noninvasive means to obtain this information. In this study, a density calibration phantom was developed to convert WASPI intensity to true bone matrix density. The phantom contained a specifically designed poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PEO/PMMA) blend, whose MRI properties (T(1), T(2), and resonance linewidth) were similar to those of solid bone matrix (collagen, tightly bound water, and other immobile molecules), minimizing the need to correct for differences in T(1) and/or T(2) relaxation between the phantom and the subject. Cortical and trabecular porcine bone specimens were imaged using WASPI with the calibration phantom in the field of view (FOV) as a stable intensity reference. Gravimetric and amino acid analyses were carried out on the same specimens after WASPI, and the chemical results were found to be highly correlated (r(2) = 0.98 and 0.95, respectively) to the WASPI intensity. By this procedure the WASPI intensity can be used to obtain the true bone matrix mass density in g cm(-3).

(c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

PMID:
19025909
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2867607
Free PMC Article

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