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J Rheumatol. 2009 Feb;36(2):378-84. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.080646.

Serum uric acid is associated with carotid plaques: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

Author information

  • 1Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite X-200, Boston, MA 02118, USA. tneogi@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association of serum uric acid (SUA) with a marker of preclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD), carotid atherosclerotic plaques (PLQ), where early evidence of risk may be evident, focusing on individuals without CV risk factors.

METHODS:

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study is a multicenter study designed to assess risk factors for heart disease. PLQ were assessed with carotid ultrasound. We conducted sex-specific logistic regression to assess the association of SUA with presence of PLQ, including analyses among persons without risk factors related to both CVD and hyperuricemia.

RESULTS:

In total, 4,866 participants had both SUA and carotid ultrasound assessed (54% women, mean age 52 yrs, mean body mass index 27.6). The association of SUA with PLQ increased with increasing SUA levels, demonstrating a dose-response relation for men [OR 1.0, 1.29, 1.61, 1.75, for SUA categories < 5 (reference), 5 to < 6, 6 to < 6.8, >or= 6.8 mg/dl, respectively; p = 0.002]. Similar associations were found in men without CV risk factors. We found no relation of SUA with PLQ in women.

CONCLUSION:

In this large study, SUA was associated with carotid atherosclerotic plaques in men. Results were similar in the absence of CV risk factors. These results suggest that SUA may have a pathophysiologic role in atherosclerosis in men.

PMID:
19012359
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2731484
Free PMC Article
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