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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(6):341-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2007.12.004.

Reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda has a limited impact on beverage consumption patterns in Maine high school youth.

Author information

  • 1Exercise, Health, and Sport Sciences Department, University of Southern Maine, Gorham, Maine 04038, USA. jwblum@usm.maine.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine change in high school students' beverage consumption patterns pre- and post-intervention of reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and diet soda in school food venues.

DESIGN:

A prospective, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized study design.

SETTING:

Public high schools.

PARTICIPANTS:

A convenience sample from control (n = 221) and intervention (n = 235) high schools.

INTERVENTION:

Schools aimed to reduce (n = 4) or not change (n = 3) availability of SSB and diet soda in food venues for 1 school year.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Subjects' beverage servings/day was determined from a food frequency questionnaire pre- and post-intervention.

ANALYSIS:

Two-by-two mixed analysis of variance model compared pre- to post-intervention servings/day between control and intervention subjects, stratified by gender.

RESULTS:

Consumption of SSB decreased in both intervention and control boys (F = 53.69, P < .05) and girls (F = 22.87, P < .05). Intervention girls decreased diet soda consumption as compared to control girls (F = 6.57, P < .05).

CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS:

Reducing availability of SSB in schools did not result in a greater decrease in SSB consumption by intervention as compared to control subjects. The impact of reducing availability of SSB at school may be limited. A better understanding of beverage consumption patterns may be needed to determine the efficacy of school food policies on those youth susceptible to obesity.

PMID:
18984489
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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