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Am J Prev Med. 2009 Jan;36(1):29-34. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.09.021. Epub 2008 Nov 1.

Physical activity in women: effects of a self-regulation intervention.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA. stadler@psych.columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A physically active lifestyle during midlife is critical to the maintenance of high physical functioning. This study tested whether an intervention that combined information with cognitive-behavioral strategies had a better effect on women's physical activity than an information-only intervention.

DESIGN:

A 4-month longitudinal RCT comparing two brief interventions was conducted between July 2003 and September 2004. Analyses were completed in June 2008.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

256 women aged 30-50 years in a large metropolitan area in Germany.

INTERVENTION:

The study compared a health information intervention with an information + self-regulation intervention. All participants received the same information intervention; participants in the information + self-regulation group additionally learned a technique that integrates mental contrasting with implementation intentions.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-reported minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week.

RESULTS:

Participants in the information + self-regulation group were twice as physically active (i.e., nearly 1 hour more per week) as participants in the information group. This difference appeared as early as the first week after intervention and was maintained over the course of the 4 months. Participants in the information group slightly increased their baseline physical activity after intervention.

CONCLUSIONS:

Women who learned a self-regulation technique during an information session were substantially more active than women who participated in only the information session. The self-regulation technique should be tested further as a tool for increasing the impact of interventions on behavioral change.

PMID:
18977113
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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