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J Med Libr Assoc. 2008 Oct;96(4):343-50. doi: 10.3163/1536-5050.96.4.009.

Library roles in disaster response: an oral history project by the National Library of Medicine.

Author information

  • 1National Library of Medicine, Yale University, 333 Cedar Street P.O. Box 208014, New Haven, CT 06520-8014, USA. robin.featherstone@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To develop a knowledgebase of stories illustrating the variety of roles that librarians can assume in emergency and disaster planning, preparedness, response, and recovery, the National Library of Medicine conducted an oral history project during the summer of 2007. The history aimed to describe clearly and compellingly the activities--both expected and unusual--that librarians performed during and in the aftermath of the disasters. While various types of libraries were included in interviews, the overall focus of the project was on elucidating roles for medical libraries.

METHODS:

Using four broad questions as the basis for telephone and email interviews, the investigators recorded the stories of twenty-three North American librarians who responded to bombings and other acts of terrorism, earthquakes, epidemics, fires, floods, hurricanes, and tornados.

RESULTS:

Through the process of conducting the oral history, an understanding of multiple roles for libraries in disaster response emerged. The roles fit into eight categories: institutional supporters, collection managers, information disseminators, internal planners, community supporters, government partners, educators and trainers, and information community builders.

CONCLUSIONS:

Librarians--particularly health sciences librarians--made significant contributions to preparedness and recovery activities surrounding recent disasters. Lessons learned from the oral history project increased understanding of and underscored the value of collaborative relationships between libraries and local, state, and federal disaster management agencies and organizations.

PMID:
18974811
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2568836
Free PMC Article

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