Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Pediatr Surg. 2008 Nov;43(11):2031-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2008.05.035.

Early laparoscopic fundoplication and gastrostomy in infants with spinal muscular atrophy type I.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792-7375, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in children leads to progressive muscle weakness, dysphagia, aspiration, and death. We hypothesized that early laparoscopic fundoplication and gastrostomy in infants with SMA type I could be performed safely perhaps leading to fewer aspiration events and improved nutritional status.

METHODS:

Children diagnosed with SMA type I from 2002 through 2005 were included (n = 12). All children underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication with gastrostomy shortly after diagnosis. Postoperative respiratory management and discharge criteria were standardized.

RESULTS:

All patients were extubated immediately postoperatively. There were no significant complications. Average time to full feeding and inpatient length of stay were 42 +/- 4.9 hours (range, 30-48 hours) and 78 +/- 22.5 hours (range, 44-120 hours), respectively. Mean weight-for-length percentile was doubled at 1 year postoperatively (P = .03). The number of respiratory-related hospitalizations in the cohort decreased by almost 50% in the ensuing 12 months after surgery, although this did not reach statistical significance in this small cohort (P = .34).

CONCLUSIONS:

Early laparoscopic fundoplication and gastrostomy is safe and is associated with improved nutritional status. A trend toward fewer significant long-term aspiration-related events was seen after fundoplication. To better assess the long-term benefits of performing an antireflux procedure in these high-risk patients, a larger prospective trial comparing current nutritional support practices is needed.

PMID:
18970936
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk