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Psychol Sci. 2008 Sep;19(9):926-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02178.x.

Exploring the cold-to-hot empathy gap in smokers.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 3137 Sennott Square, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. sayette@pitt.edu

Abstract

Many decisions related to cigarette smoking require people in an affectively neutral, or "cold," state to predict how they will feel or behave when in a craving, or "hot," state. Research in other domains has revealed that individuals in cold states often underestimate the impact of being in a hot state on their own future behavior. In a study testing whether this is true of cigarette craving, 98 smokers were assigned to one of three conditions: hot (during a high-craving first session, they made predictions about a high-craving state in a second session), cold (during a low-craving first session, they made predictions about a high-craving state in a second session), and comparison (they experienced a high-craving session only). As predicted, in contrast to smokers in the hot group, smokers in the cold group underpredicted the value they would place on smoking during the second session. Results support the existence of a cold-to-hot empathy gap in smokers and help to explain diverse aspects of tobacco addiction.

PMID:
18947359
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2630055
Free PMC Article

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