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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008 Oct;101(4):382-6. doi: 10.1016/S1081-1206(10)60314-6.

Brief-interval telephone surveys of medication adherence and asthma symptoms in the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado 80206, USA. benderb@njc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although it is known that most patients do not consistently take controller medications every day, the impact of nonadherence on asthma control is not well documented.

OBJECTIVE:

To establish the relationship between medication adherence and symptom control in adolescents and young adults with asthma.

METHODS:

A total of 756 adolescents and young adults diagnosed as having mild to moderate asthma on entry into the original study underwent 6 monthly telephone interviews as an ancillary project to the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study. Participants were queried about medication use and symptom control within each 1-month interview window. Strategies adopted to improve self-report accuracy included use of repeated interviews, confidential reporting to staff unknown to the participants, and use of questions focused on recent behavior.

RESULTS:

Only participants who were consistently on inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) for the entire 6-month study interval were included. Three groups of patients were contrasted: those not on ICSs (n = 420), those on ICSs with high adherence (> or = 75% of medication taken, n = 90), and those on ICSs with low/medium adherence (< 75% of medication taken, n = 148). Participants in the low/medium adherence group reported, on average, less symptom control and more variability in wheezing, awakening at night, missed activities, and beta2-agonist use during the 6-month period, although most in this group perceived their asthma to be under good control.

CONCLUSION:

Despite extensive patient education and support, diminished ICS adherence was frequent and undermined symptom control in this group of adolescents and young adults with mild to moderate asthma.

PMID:
18939726
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2949348
Free PMC Article

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