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Diabetes Care. 2008 Dec;31(12):2349-56. doi: 10.2337/dc08-0911. Epub 2008 Oct 3.

Adult metabolic syndrome and impaired glucose tolerance are associated with different patterns of BMI gain during infancy: Data from the New Delhi Birth Cohort.

Author information

  • 1MRC Epidemiology Resource Centre, Southampton, UK. chdf@mrc.soton.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of infant, childhood, and adolescent BMI and weight associated with adult metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

We measured waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations, and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition) in 1,492 men and women aged 26-32 years in Delhi, India, whose weight and height were recorded every 6 months throughout infancy (0-2 years), childhood (2-11 years), and adolescence (11 years-adult).

RESULTS:

Men and women with metabolic syndrome (29% overall), any of its component features, or higher (greater than upper quartile) insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) had more rapid BMI or weight gain than the rest of the cohort throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Glucose intolerance (impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes) was, like metabolic syndrome, associated with rapid BMI gain in childhood and adolescence but with lower BMI in infancy.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this Indian population, patterns of infant BMI and weight gain differed for individuals who developed metabolic syndrome (rapid gain) compared with those who developed glucose intolerance (low infant BMI). Rapid BMI gain during childhood and adolescence was a risk factor for both disorders.

PMID:
18835958
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2584194
Free PMC Article
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