Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Diagn Cytopathol. 2008 Nov;36(11):776-9. doi: 10.1002/dc.20905.

Pap smear findings in chronic renal failure patients compared with the normal population according to Bethesda 2001.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pathology, Başkent University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey. nihanh@baskent-ank.edu.tr

Abstract

Dialysis remains the most common treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Although the increased risk of cancer after renal transplant is well documented, there is less certainty about the risk of cancer in patients treated only with dialysis. From 1997 to 2002, 262 ESRD patients received a Pap test at Başkent University. The smears of 149 patients who had ESRD for more than 9 months were compared with the smears of 150 otherwise healthy patients. All of the Pap smears were re-examined according to Bethesda 2001 criteria. The mean age of the patients was 42.88 years. Regarding micro-organisms, no statistically significant difference between the groups were observed. In 36 Pap smears, a shift in flora suggestive of bacterial vaginosis was detected. There were statistically significant differences between the groups. When age was considered as a marker of atrophy, atrophy in patients younger than 50 years was statistically different between the groups. Also, we determined that the shift in flora suggestive of bacterial vaginosis and atrophy in patients aged younger than 50 years did not depend on the length of hemodialysis. Of 13 patients (4.3%) who had epithelial cell abnormalities there were not statistically significant differences between the groups. In conclusion, according to our study, CRF seems not to be a predictive factor for cervical cancer. Shift in flora suggestive of bacterial vaginosis and atrophy in patients aged younger than 50 years might be the natural effects of uremia, and they appear not to be dependent on the length of the hemodialysis period.

PMID:
18831015
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk