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Stem Cells. 2009 Jan;27(1):250-8. doi: 10.1634/stemcells.2008-0178.

IFATS collection: Human adipose-derived stem cells seeded on a silk fibroin-chitosan scaffold enhance wound repair in a murine soft tissue injury model.

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  • 1Department of Molecular Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, 77030, USA.

Abstract

Soft tissue loss presents an ongoing challenge in reconstructive surgery. Local stem cell application has recently been suggested as a possible novel therapy. In the present study we evaluated the potential of a silk fibroin-chitosan (SFCS) scaffold serving as a delivery vehicle for human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in a murine soft tissue injury model. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled ASCs were seeded on SFCS scaffolds at a density of 1 x 10(5) ASCs per cm(2) for 48 hours and then suture-inlaid to a 6-mm, full-thickness skin defect in 6-week-old male athymic mice. Wound healing was tracked for 2 weeks by planimetry. Histology was evaluated at 2 and 4 weeks. Our data show that the extent of wound closure was significantly enhanced in the ASC-SFCS group versus SFCS and no-graft controls at postoperative day 8 (90% +/- 3% closure vs. 75% +/- 11% and 55% +/- 17%, respectively). Microvessel density at wound bed biopsy sites from 2 weeks postoperative was significantly higher in the ASC-SFCS group versus SFCS alone (7.5 +/- 1.1 vs. 5.1 +/- 1.0 vessels per high-power field). Engrafted stem cells were positive for the fibroblastic marker heat shock protein 47, smooth muscle actin, and von Willebrand factor at both 2 and 4 weeks. GFP-positive stem cells were also found to differentiate into epidermal epithelial cells at 4 weeks postoperative. In conclusion, human adipose-derived stem cells seeded on a silk fibroin-chitosan scaffold enhance wound healing and show differentiation into fibrovascular, endothelial, and epithelial components of restored tissue.

PMID:
18818439
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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