Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
World J Surg Oncol. 2008 Sep 23;6:101. doi: 10.1186/1477-7819-6-101.

Low grade epithelial stromal tumour of the seminal vesicle.

Author information

  • 11Division of Urology, Guastalla Hospital, Guastalla , RE, Italy. bruno.monica@auslre.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The mixed epithelial stromal tumour is morphologically characterised by a mixture of solid and cystic areas consisting of a biphasic proliferation of glands admixed with solid areas of spindle cells with variable cellularity and growth patterns. In previous reports the seminal vesicle cystoadenoma was either considered a synonym of or misdiagnosed as mixed epithelial stromal tumour. The recent World Health Organisation Classification of Tumours considered the two lesions as two distinct neoplasms. This work is aimed to present the low-grade epithelial stromal tumour case and the review of the literature to the extent of establishing the true frequency of the neoplasm.

CASE PRESENTATION:

We describe a low-grade epithelial stromal tumour of the seminal vesicle in a 50-year-old man. Computed tomography showed a 9 x 4.5 cm pelvic mass in the side of the seminal vesicle displacing the prostate and the urinary bladder. Magnetic resonance was able to define tissue planes between the lesion and the adjacent structures and provided useful information for an accurate conservative laparotomic surgical approach. The histology revealed biphasic proliferation of benign glands admixed with stromal cellularity, with focal atypia. After 26 months after the excision the patient is still alive with no evidence of disease.

CONCLUSION:

Cystoadenoma and mixed epithelial stromal tumour of seminal vesicle are two distinct pathological entities with different histological features and clinical outcome. Due to the unavailability of accurate prognostic parameters, the prediction of the potential biological evolution of mixed epithelial stromal tumour is still difficult. In our case magnetic resonance imaging was able to avoid an exploratory laparotomy and to establish an accurate conservative surgical treatment of the tumour.

PMID:
18811925
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2564931
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (5)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk