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Br Med Bull. 2008;87:31-47. doi: 10.1093/bmb/ldn026.

Myocardial tissue engineering.

Author information

  • 1Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, UK.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Regeneration of the infarcted myocardium after a heart attack is one of the most challenging aspects in tissue engineering. Suitable cell sources and optimized biocompatible materials must be identified.

SOURCES OF DATA:

In this review, we briefly discuss the current therapeutic options available to patients with heart failure post-myocardial infarction. We describe the various strategies currently proposed to encourage myocardial regeneration, with focus on the achievements in myocardial tissue engineering (MTE). We report on the current cell types, materials and methods being investigated for developing a tissue-engineered myocardial construct.

AREAS OF AGREEMENT:

Generally, there is agreement that a 'vehicle' is required to transport cells to the infarcted heart to help myocardial repair and regeneration.

AREAS OF CONTROVERSY:

Suitable cell source, biomaterials, cell environment and implantation time post-infarction remain obstacles in the field of MTE.

GROWING POINTS:

Research is being focused on optimizing natural and synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering. The type of cell and its origin (autologous or derived from embryonic stem cells), cell density and method of cell delivery are also being explored.

AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH:

The possibility is being explored that materials may not only act as a support for the delivered cell implants, but may also add value by changing cell survival, maturation or integration, or by prevention of mechanical and electrical remodelling of the failing heart.

PMID:
18790825
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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