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Public Health Nutr. 2009 Aug;12(8):1189-96. doi: 10.1017/S1368980008003686. Epub 2008 Sep 15.

Predictors of nutritional status among community-dwelling older adults in Wuhan, China.

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  • 1School of Nursing, Yunyang Medical College, 30 Renmin South Road, Shiyan, Hubei 442000, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the nutritional and functional status of community older adults in China, to identify the related factors and best predictors of elder nutrition.

DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS:

A cross-sectional, descriptive correlation design was utilized. A convenience sample of 162 community older adults (aged > or = 65 years) were administered three questionnaires, which were used to obtain demographic characteristics, nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, MNA) and functional status (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, IADL).

RESULTS:

The mean MNA score was 23.8 (sd 3.92), 36.4 % of elders were at risk of malnutrition and 8.0 % were malnourished; 61.7 % were functionally independent. Spearman's correlation analysis indicated that age, marital status, education level, personal income, number of chronic medical conditions suffered and functional status had significant correlations with nutritional status. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis identified that the best predictors were the number of chronic conditions suffered, age, functional status and marital status.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study has suggested that nutritional health remains a problem among older adults in the Chinese community. A large proportion was on the borderline of malnutrition, and deficiency as well as excesses coexisted. Malnutrition is an increasing hazard especially for those suffering from more diseases, at a highly advanced age, functionally dependent and widowed.

PMID:
18789169
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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