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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Dec;93(12):4711-20. doi: 10.1210/jc.2008-0998. Epub 2008 Sep 9.

Effects of continuous versus intermittent exercise, obesity, and gender on growth hormone secretion.

Author information

  • 1Department of Human Services, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA. alw2v@virginia.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Obesity attenuates spontaneous GH secretion and the GH response to exercise. Obese individuals often have low fitness levels, limiting their ability to complete a typical 30-min bout of continuous exercise. An alternative regimen in obese subjects may be shorter bouts of exercise interspersed throughout the day.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the study was to examine whether intermittent and continuous exercise interventions evoke similar patterns of 24-h GH secretion and whether responses are attenuated in obese subjects or affected by gender.

DESIGN:

This was a repeated-measures design in which each subject served as their own control.

SETTING:

This study was conducted at the University of Virginia General Clinical Research Center.

SUBJECTS:

Subjects were healthy nonobese (n = 15) and obese (n = 14) young adults.

INTERVENTIONS:

Subjects were studied over 24 h at the General Clinical Research Center on three occasions: control, one 30-min bout of exercise, and three 10-min bouts of exercise.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Twenty-four hour GH secretion was measured.

RESULTS:

Compared with unstimulated 24-h GH secretion, both intermittent and continuous exercise, at constant exercise intensity, resulted in severalfold elevation of 24-h integrated serum GH concentrations in young adults. Basal and pulsatile modes of GH secretion were attenuated both at rest and during exercise in obese subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present data suggest that continuous and intermittent exercise training should be comparably effective in increasing 24-h GH secretion.

PMID:
18782875
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2626448
Free PMC Article
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