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J Cell Mol Med. 2008 Aug;12(4):1238-49. doi: 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2008.00137.x.

Spatial and temporal patterns of bone formation in ectopically pre-fabricated, autologous cell-based engineered bone flaps in rabbits.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. oliver.scheufler@helios-kliniken.de

Abstract

Biological substitutes for autologous bone flaps could be generated by combining flap pre-fabrication and bone tissue engineering concepts. Here, we investigated the pattern of neotissue formation within large pre-fabricated engineered bone flaps in rabbits. Bone marrow stromal cells from 12 New Zealand White rabbits were expanded and uniformly seeded in porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds (tapered cylinders, 10-20 mm diameter, 30 mm height) using a perfusion bioreactor. Autologous cell-scaffold constructs were wrapped in a panniculus carnosus flap, covered by a semipermeable membrane and ectopically implanted. Histological analysis, substantiated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computerized tomography scans, indicated three distinct zones: an outer one, including bone tissue; a middle zone, formed by fibrous connective tissue; and a central zone, essentially necrotic. The depths of connective tissue and of bone ingrowth were consistent at different construct diameters and significantly increased from respectively 3.1+/-0.7 mm and 1.0+/-0.4 mm at 8 weeks to 3.7+/-0.6 mm and 1.4+/-0.6 mm at 12 weeks. Bone formation was found at a maximum depth of 1.8 mm after 12 weeks. Our findings indicate the feasibility of ectopic pre-fabrication of large cell-based engineered bone flaps and prompt for the implementation of strategies to improve construct vascularization, in order to possibly accelerate bone formation towards the core of the grafts.

PMID:
18782188
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3865668
Free PMC Article
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