Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Digit Imaging. 2009 Dec;22(6):667-80. doi: 10.1007/s10278-008-9145-9. Epub 2008 Sep 6.

Collecting 48,000 CT exams for the lung screening study of the National Lung Screening Trial.

Author information

  • 1Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University, 510 South Kingshighway, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA. clarkk@mir.wustl.edu

Abstract

From 2002-2004, the Lung Screening Study (LSS) of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) enrolled 34,614 participants, aged 55-74 years, at increased risk for lung cancer due to heavy cigarette smoking. Participants, randomized to standard chest X-ray (CXR) or computed tomography (CT) arms at ten screening centers, received up to three imaging screens for lung cancer at annual intervals. Participant medical histories and radiologist-interpreted screening results were transmitted to the LSS coordinating center, while all images were retained at local screening centers. From 2005-2007, all CT exams were uniformly de-identified and delivered to a central repository, the CT Image Library (CTIL), on external hard drives (94%) or CD/DVD (5.9%), or over a secure Internet connection (0.1%). Of 48,723 CT screens performed, only 176 (0.3%) were unavailable (lost, corrupted, compressed) while 48,547 (99.7%) were delivered to the CTIL. Described here is the experience organizing, implementing, and adapting the clinical-trial workflow surrounding the image retrieval, de-identification, delivery, and archiving of available LSS-NLST CT exams for the CTIL, together with the quality assurance procedures associated with those collection tasks. This collection of CT exams, obtained in a specific, well-defined participant population under a common protocol at evenly spaced intervals, and its attending demographic and clinical information, are now available to lung-disease investigators and developers of computer-aided-diagnosis algorithms. The approach to large scale, multi-center trial CT image collection detailed here may serve as a useful model, while the experience reported should be valuable in the planning and execution of future equivalent endeavors.

PMID:
18777192
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3043737
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk