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PLoS Comput Biol. 2008 Aug 22;4(8):e1000158. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000158.

Modeling ChIP sequencing in silico with applications.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

Abstract

ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a new method for genomewide mapping of protein binding sites on DNA. It has generated much excitement in functional genomics. To score data and determine adequate sequencing depth, both the genomic background and the binding sites must be properly modeled. To develop a computational foundation to tackle these issues, we first performed a study to characterize the observed statistical nature of this new type of high-throughput data. By linking sequence tags into clusters, we show that there are two components to the distribution of tag counts observed in a number of recent experiments: an initial power-law distribution and a subsequent long right tail. Then we develop in silico ChIP-seq, a computational method to simulate the experimental outcome by placing tags onto the genome according to particular assumed distributions for the actual binding sites and for the background genomic sequence. In contrast to current assumptions, our results show that both the background and the binding sites need to have a markedly nonuniform distribution in order to correctly model the observed ChIP-seq data, with, for instance, the background tag counts modeled by a gamma distribution. On the basis of these results, we extend an existing scoring approach by using a more realistic genomic-background model. This enables us to identify transcription-factor binding sites in ChIP-seq data in a statistically rigorous fashion.

PMID:
18725927
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2507756
Free PMC Article

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