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Anesth Analg. 2008 Sep;107(3):811-6. doi: 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181804441.

Extra-1 acupressure for children undergoing anesthesia.

Author information

  • 1Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. shu-ming.wang@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acupuncture and related techniques have been used as adjuncts for perioperative anesthesia management. We examined whether acupressure in the Extra-1 (Yin-Tang) point would result in decreased preprocedural anxiety and reduced intraprocedural propofol requirements in a group of children undergoing endoscopic procedures.

METHODS:

Fifty-two children were randomized to receive acupressure bead intervention either at the Extra-1 acupuncture point or at a sham point. A Bispectral Index (BIS) monitor was applied to all children before the onset of the intervention. Anxiety was assessed at baseline and before entrance to the operating room. Anesthetic techniques were standardized and maintained with IV propofol infusion titrated to keep BIS values of 40-60.

RESULTS:

We found that after the intervention, children in the Extra-1 group experienced reduced anxiety whereas children in the sham group experienced increased anxiety (-9% [-3 to -15] vs 2% [-6 to 7.4], P = 0.012). In contrast, no significant changes in BIS values were observed in the preprocedural waiting period between groups (P = ns). We also found that total intraprocedural propofol requirements did not differ between the two study groups (214 +/- 76 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) vs 229 +/- 95 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.52).

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that acupressure bead intervention at Extra-1 acupoint reduces preprocedural anxiety in children undergoing endoscopic procedures. This intervention, however, has no impact on BIS values or intraprocedural propofol requirements.

PMID:
18713889
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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