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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Aug 15;233(4):618-23. doi: 10.2460/javma.233.4.618.

Outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport in a beef cow-calf herd associated with exposure to bovine viral diarrhea virus.

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  • 1Veterinary Science Department, College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION:

Severe disease and death in cows and calves affected 1 of 3 separate groups (A, B, and C) of cattle on a commercial cow-calf operation.

CLINICAL FINDINGS:

Clinical illness consisting of severe watery and bloody diarrhea, dehydration, weakness, and death affected adult cows and calves in 1 group (group B). Salmonella enterica serotype Newport was recovered from tissues of cows and calves from group B.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME:

Despite supportive and antimicrobial treatment of cattle in group B, cow mortality rate attributable to salmonellosis in that group was 7.9% (32/407); calf mortality rate was 14.4% (52/361). None of the cows in Groups A or C died, and the calf mortality rate in those groups was low. Salmonella enterica serotype Newport was recovered from pooled fecal samples subsequently collected from each group of cows. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antigen was identified in an ear notch sample collected from a necropsied calf from group B. Subsequently, ear notch specimens from cattle in all 3 groups were tested for BVDV antigen. A significantly higher proportion of calves persistently infected with BVDV was identified in group B (8/295 [2.7%]), compared with the proportion in groups A and C combined (1/287 [0.3%]).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Outbreaks of disease attributable to Salmonella Newport infection in beef cattle are unusual. Because of the immunosuppressive nature of BVDV, the possibility of animals persistently infected with BVDV within the herd should be considered during investigation of unusual outbreaks of infectious diseases.

PMID:
18710321
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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