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Neurosurgery. 1991 Jul;29(1):55-60; discussion 60-1.

Extent of mesiobasal resection determines outcome after temporal lobectomy for intractable complex partial seizures.

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  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinical Foundation, Ohio.

Abstract

The extent of resection was assessed in 94 patients who underwent temporal lobectomy for medically intractable complex partial seizures originating from a unilateral seizure focus in the anteromesial temporal lobe. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in the coronal plane was used to quantify the extent of resection of lateral and mesiobasal structures according to a 20-compartment model of the temporal lobe. Successful seizure outcome (greater than or equal to 90% reduction in seizure frequency) was accomplished in 83% of the patients (all followed up for more than 1 year; mean duration of follow-up, 25.2 months) and correlated significantly (P less than 0.05) with the extent of mesiobasal resection, regardless of the extent of resection of lateral structures. Successful seizure outcome was accomplished in 81% of the patients with no structural lesions, and also correlated significantly (P less than 0.05) with the extent of mesiobasal resection regardless of the extent of lateral resection. A successful seizure outcome was accomplished in 90% of the 21 patients with structural lesions documented by neuroimaging studies. Two patients who underwent extensive lobectomy without resection of the structural lesion had no reduction in seizure frequency postoperatively. We conclude that the most important factor in determining the outcome of temporal lobectomy in patients with unilateral anteromesial temporal lobe epileptogenicity is the extent of resection of structures in the mesiobasal temporal lobe. In patients with structural lesions, lesion resection may be an added contributor to successful seizure outcome.

PMID:
1870688
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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