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Acta Neurol Scand. 2009 Mar;119(3):172-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2008.01084.x. Epub 2008 Aug 14.

Cognitive effects of memantine in postmenopausal women at risk of dementia: a pilot study.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5723, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To determine the effects of memantine on cognition in a normal population of postmenopausal women with putative risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) using a built-in control for the genetic risk factor for AD (apoE-epsilon4 status).

METHODS:

A prospective, open-label, 6-month pilot medication trial with memantine and follow-up after discontinuance conducted at the Center for Neuroscience in Women's Health, Stanford University School of Medicine. Neuropsychological data were collected on 22 community-dwelling postmenopausal women (11 apoE-epsilon4 carriers and 11 apoE-epsilon4 non-carriers) with at least one putative risk factor for AD.

RESULTS:

ApoE-epsilon4 status was not a significant predictor of change in neuropsychological performance. Changes associated with memantine treatment for entire sample included significant declines in some variables associated with verbal learning and memory that improved upon medication withdrawal. A positive medication effect was noted with executive functions and possibly category fluency. Trend-level improvements were seen in motor dexterity of the non-dominant hand and maintained even after drug discontinuance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Treatment with memantine appeared to have differential effects on cognitive performance in a population of women with putative risk factors for AD. ApoE-epsilon4 carrier status did not account for observed changes in cognition.

PMID:
18705678
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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