Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
JAMA. 2008 Aug 13;300(6):663-75. doi: 10.1001/jama.300.6.663.

Alcohol use and alcohol-related problems before and after military combat deployment.

Author information

  • 1DoD Center for Deployment Health Research, Naval Health Research Center, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego, CA 92106-3521, USA. Isabel.Jacobson@med.navy.mil

Abstract

CONTEXT:

High rates of alcohol misuse after deployment have been reported among personnel returning from past conflicts, yet investigations of alcohol misuse after return from the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are lacking.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether deployment with combat exposures was associated with new-onset or continued alcohol consumption, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Data were from Millennium Cohort Study participants who completed both a baseline (July 2001 to June 2003; n=77,047) and follow-up (June 2004 to February 2006; n=55,021) questionnaire (follow-up response rate = 71.4%). After we applied exclusion criteria, our analyses included 48,481 participants (active duty, n = 26,613; Reserve or National Guard, n = 21,868). Of these, 5510 deployed with combat exposures, 5661 deployed without combat exposures, and 37 310 did not deploy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

New-onset and continued heavy weekly drinking, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems at follow-up.

RESULTS:

Baseline prevalence of heavy weekly drinking, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems among Reserve or National Guard personnel who deployed with combat exposures was 9.0%, 53.6%, and 15.2%, respectively; follow-up prevalence was 12.5%, 53.0%, and 11.9%, respectively; and new-onset rates were 8.8%, 25.6%, and 7.1%, respectively. Among active-duty personnel, new-onset rates were 6.0%, 26.6%, and 4.8%, respectively. Reserve and National Guard personnel who deployed and reported combat exposures were significantly more likely to experience new-onset heavy weekly drinking (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-1.96), binge drinking (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.24-1.71), and alcohol-related problems (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.33-2.01) compared with nondeployed personnel. The youngest members of the cohort were at highest risk for all alcohol-related outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

Reserve and National Guard personnel and younger service members who deploy with reported combat exposures are at increased risk of new-onset heavy weekly drinking, binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems.

Comment in

PMID:
18698065
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2680184
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Figure
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk