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Arch Neurol. 2008 Oct;65(10):1304-9. doi: 10.1001/archneur.65.10.noc80013. Epub 2008 Aug 11.

Assessment of beta-amyloid in a frontal cortical brain biopsy specimen and by positron emission tomography with carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B.

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  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. ville.leinonen@kuh.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B ([11C]PiB) positron emission tomography (PET) findings in patients with and without Alzheimer disease lesions in frontal cortical biopsy specimens.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study of [11C]PiB PET findings in patients with or without beta-amyloid (Abeta) aggregates in frontal cortical biopsy specimens.

SETTING:

Two university hospitals in Finland. Patients Ten patients who had undergone intraventricular pressure monitoring with a frontal cortical biopsy (evaluated for Abeta aggregates and hyperphosphorylated tau) for suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus.

INTERVENTIONS:

[11C]PiB PET and evaluation for cognitive impairment using a battery of neuropsychological tests.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Immunohistochemical evaluation for Abeta aggregates and hyperphosphorylated tau in the frontal cortical biopsy specimen and [11C]PiB PET.

RESULTS:

In patients with Abeta aggregates in the frontal cortical biopsy specimen, PET imaging revealed higher [11C]PiB uptake (P < .05) in the frontal, parietal, and lateral temporal cortices and in the striatum as compared with the patients without frontal Abeta deposits.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study supports the use of noninvasive [11C]PiB PET in the assessment of Abeta deposition in the brain. Large prospective studies are required to verify whether [11C]PiB PET will be a diagnostic aid, particularly in early Alzheimer disease.

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PMID:
18695050
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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