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Am J Cardiol. 2008 Aug 15;102(4):396-400. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.03.074. Epub 2008 May 22.

Comparison of increased aspirin dose versus combined aspirin plus clopidogrel therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease and impaired antiplatelet response to low-dose aspirin.

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  • 1Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey. akifduzenli@hotmail.com

Abstract

The effects of therapy with aspirin 300 mg/day and with combined aspirin 100 mg/day plus clopidogrel 75 mg/day on platelet function were compared in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease and impaired antiplatelet responses to aspirin 100 mg/day. The study population consisted of 151 outpatients with type II diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease who were taking aspirin 100 mg/day. Of the 151 patients, a subgroup of subjects with impaired aspirin response were selected on the basis of the results of platelet aggregometry. Nonresponsiveness to aspirin was defined as mean aggregation > or =69% with 3 micromol/L adenosine diphosphate and mean aggregation > or =70% with 2 micromol/L collagen. Aspirin semiresponders were defined as meeting 1 but not both of these criteria. Nonresponders and semiresponders were randomized equally to aspirin 300 mg/day and aspirin 100 mg/day plus clopidogrel 75 mg/day, and aggregation tests were repeated after 2 weeks. Sixty of the 151 patients with diabetes (40%) were found to respond to aspirin inadequately. Platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate and collagen decreased significantly after aspirin 300 mg/day or combined therapy. Combined treatment was found to have a stronger inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate than aspirin 300 mg/day (p = 0.002). Impaired aspirin response was resolved by increasing the aspirin dose or adding clopidogrel to aspirin (p <0.0001 for each). However, desired platelet inhibition was achieved in significantly more patients by combined treatment than by aspirin 300 mg/day (p <0.05). In conclusion, aspirin 100 mg/day does not inhibit platelet function adequately in a significant number of patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. Increasing the aspirin dose to 300 mg/day or adding clopidogrel to aspirin can provide adequate platelet inhibition in a significant number of those patients with impaired responses to low-dose aspirin.

PMID:
18678294
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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