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Biol Psychiatry. 2008 Dec 1;64(11):941-50. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2008.06.007. Epub 2008 Jul 26.

Delta FosB-mediated alterations in dopamine signaling are normalized by a palatable high-fat diet.

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  • 1Department of Animal Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6046, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sensitivity to reward has been implicated as a predisposing factor for behaviors related to drug abuse as well as overeating. However, the underlying mechanisms contributing to reward sensitivity are unknown. We hypothesized that a dysregulation in dopamine signaling might be an underlying cause of heightened reward sensitivity whereby rewarding stimuli could act to normalize the system.

METHODS:

We used a genetic mouse model of increased reward sensitivity, the Delta FosB-overexpressing mouse, to examine reward pathway changes in response to a palatable high-fat diet. Markers of reward signaling in these mice were examined both basally and following 6 weeks of palatable diet exposure. Mice were examined in a behavioral test following high-fat diet withdrawal to assess the vulnerability of this model to removal of rewarding stimuli.

RESULTS:

Our results demonstrate altered reward pathway activation along the nucleus accumbens-hypothalamic-ventral tegmental area circuitry resulting from overexpression of Delta FosB in the nucleus accumbens and striatal regions. Levels of phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (pCREB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and dopamine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate regulated phosphoprotein with a molecular mass of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) in the nucleus accumbens were reduced in Delta FosB mice, suggestive of reduced dopamine signaling. Six weeks of high-fat diet exposure completely ameliorated these differences, revealing the potent rewarding capacity of a palatable diet. Delta FosB mice also showed a significant increase in locomotor activity and anxiety-related responses 24 hours following high-fat withdrawal.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results establish an underlying sensitivity to changes in reward related to dysregulation of Delta FosB and dopamine signaling that can be normalized with palatable diets and may be a predisposing phenotype in some forms of obesity.

PMID:
18657800
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2582592
Free PMC Article

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