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Jpn J Infect Dis. 2008 Jul;61(4):321-3.

Influenza viruses circulating in Thailand in 2004 and 2005.

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  • 1National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Science, Nonthaburi, Thailand. pranee@dmsc.moph.go.th.

Abstract

Determining the local circulating strain of influenza is essential to prevent and control epidemics. In the years 2004 and 2005, the National Influenza Center of Thailand received 3,854 and 3,834 specimens, respectively, from patients throughout the country, including submissions from 4 established influenza surveillance sentinel sites. In 2004, of 539 influenza-positive specimens, 461 were positive for influenza A and 78 were positive for influenza B by isolation. Influenza A subtyping revealed that 249, 197, and 15 isolates were H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1, respectively. In 2005, of 748 influenza-positive specimens, 492 were influenza A and the remaining 256 were influenza B. The results of influenza A subtyping indicated that 55, 437, and 5 isolates were H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1. All isolated strains of subtype H1N1 were A/New Caledonia/20/99-like. The isolated strains of H3N2 were A/Fujian/411/2002-like in the first half of the year 2004, while those in the latter half of 2004 gradually drifted to a mixture of A/Wellington/1/2004-like, A/California/7/2004-like, and A/Wisconsin/67/2005-like, and this mixture continued through the end of 2005. The influenza B strains were B/Sichuan/379/99-like, B/Hong Kong/330/2001-like, B/Shanghai/361/2002-like and B/Malaysia/2506/2004-like. The strains circulating in the years 2004 and 2005 were antigenically similar to the vaccine formulas recommended in the same period by WHO. Our results underscore that local influenza surveillance plays an important role in responding to epidemics and potential pandemics.

PMID:
18653981
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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