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Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Oct 1;28(7):878-85. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03808.x. Epub 2008 Jul 17.

Clinical trial: the incidence and early mortality after peptic ulcer perforation, and the use of low-dose aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

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  • 1Department of Gastroenterology, Crosshouse Hospital, Kilmarnock, Scotland, UK. ali.taha1@btinternet.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is not clear whether the incidence or early mortality related to peptic ulcer perforation has changed.

AIM:

To evaluate the incidence and mortality related to peptic ulcer perforation while considering the intake of low-dose aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

METHODS:

We recorded the numbers and details of all patients presenting in our region of Scotland with perforation between 1997 and 2006 including demography, drug usage and 30-day mortality.

RESULTS:

In subjects aged >65 years, the annual incidence of perforation was 32.7 per 10(5) of the age-specific population, of whom 10.7 per 10(5) were taking low-dose aspirin and 12.0 taking NSAIDs. These were all significantly higher (P < 0.001) than the corresponding incidence in subjects aged < or =65 years (6.6 per 10(5) overall, 1.1 taking aspirin and 2.5 taking NSAIDs). There was an increasing trend with time in the number of patients taking NSAIDs (chi(2) = 4.57, P = 0.03). Using univariate analysis, 30-day mortality was associated with aspirin [odds ratio, 2.32 (95% C.I., 1.20-4.47), P = 0.01] but not with NSAIDs. The strongest predictors of mortality were increasing age and comorbidity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Perforation remains common in elderly patients including users of NSAIDs and aspirin. Early mortality is also noted in association with increasing age and comorbidity, but not independently with drug intake.

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