Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
BMJ. 2008 Jul 1;337:a295. doi: 10.1136/bmj.a295.

Neuromuscular training and the risk of leg injuries in female floorball players: cluster randomised controlled study.

Author information

  • 1Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, FIN-33501 Tampere, Finland. kati.pasanen@uta.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether a neuromuscular training programme is effective in preventing non-contact leg injuries in female floorball players.

DESIGN:

Cluster randomised controlled study.

SETTING:

28 top level female floorball teams in Finland.

PARTICIPANTS:

457 players (mean age 24 years)-256 (14 teams) in the intervention group and 201 (14 teams) in the control group-followedup for one league season (six months).

INTERVENTION:

A neuromuscular training programme to enhance players' motor skills and body control, as well as to activate and prepare their neuromuscular system for sports specific manoeuvres.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Acute non-contact injuries of the legs.

RESULTS:

During the season, 72 acute non-contact leg injuries occurred, 20 in the intervention group and 52 in the control group. The injury incidence per 1000 hours playing and practise in the intervention group was 0.65 (95% confidence interval 0.37 to 1.13) and in the control group was 2.08 (1.58 to 2.72). The risk of non-contact leg injury was 66% lower (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.34, 95% confidence interval 0.20 to 0.57) in the intervention group.

CONCLUSION:

A neuromuscular training programme was effective in preventing acute non-contact injuries of the legs in female floorball players. Neuromuscular training can be recommended in the weekly training of these athletes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN26550281.

PMID:
18595903
PMCID:
PMC2453298
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk