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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Jun 24;105(25):8760-5. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0803545105. Epub 2008 Jun 18.

Endocannabinoid signaling controls pyramidal cell specification and long-range axon patterning.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neuroscience, Retzius väg 8, and Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Scheeles väg 1, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Endocannabinoids (eCBs) have recently been identified as axon guidance cues shaping the connectivity of local GABAergic interneurons in the developing cerebrum. However, eCB functions during pyramidal cell specification and establishment of long-range axonal connections are unknown. Here, we show that eCB signaling is operational in subcortical proliferative zones from embryonic day 12 in the mouse telencephalon and controls the proliferation of pyramidal cell progenitors and radial migration of immature pyramidal cells. When layer patterning is accomplished, developing pyramidal cells rely on eCB signaling to initiate the elongation and fasciculation of their long-range axons. Accordingly, CB(1) cannabinoid receptor (CB(1)R) null and pyramidal cell-specific conditional mutant (CB(1)R(f/f,NEX-Cre)) mice develop deficits in neuronal progenitor proliferation and axon fasciculation. Likewise, axonal pathfinding becomes impaired after in utero pharmacological blockade of CB(1)Rs. Overall, eCBs are fundamental developmental cues controlling pyramidal cell development during corticogenesis.

PMID:
18562289
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2438381
Free PMC Article

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