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Br J Dermatol. 2008 Aug;159(2):433-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2008.08656.x. Epub 2008 Jun 28.

Distribution of congenital melanocytic naevi and congenital naevus-like naevi in a survey of 3406 Italian schoolchildren.

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  • 1Centro Studi GISED, USC di Dermatologia, Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo, Largo Barozzi 1, 24100 Bergamo, Italy. gallus@marionegri.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Scanty information is available on the prevalence of congenital melanocytic naevi (CMN) and congenital naevus-like naevi (CNLN), particularly the small ones.

OBJECTIVES:

To estimate the prevalence of CMN/CNLN in Italian schoolchildren, and to assess variations according to potential risk factors for melanoma.

METHODS:

We conducted a survey in 13 Italian areas on 3406 schoolchildren aged 12-17 years. Children were examined by dermatologists who assessed pigmentary traits and made a count of small (6-15 mm in diameter) and medium/large (> 15 mm) CMN/CNLN on 19 anatomical areas.

RESULTS:

Overall, 592 children (17.4%) had one or more CMN/CNLN. Prevalence of small CMN/CNLN was 16.1%, and that of medium/large CMN/CNLN was 1.8%. There was no difference between age groups and sexes. CMN/CNLN were more frequent in children with a higher number of common melanocytic naevi (multivariate odds ratio, OR = 7.1 for the highest vs. the lowest quartile), consistent in small (OR = 7.2) and medium/large CMN/CNLN (OR = 6.0). Family history of malignant melanoma (OR = 1.4) and personal history of diabetes (OR = 4.4) appeared to be directly, and sun exposure inversely associated with CMN/CNLN. No relation was evident between CMN/CNLN and pigmentary traits, anthropometric characteristics, dietary habits, freckles, sunburns, sunscreen use or history of selected diseases.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association with family history of melanoma, the strong association with acquired melanocytic naevi, and the lack of association with pigmentary traits and sunburns suggest that CMN/CNLN may act as an independent risk marker for subjects at increased risk for cutaneous melanoma later in life.

PMID:
18547318
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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