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PLoS Genet. 2008 May 30;4(5):e1000040. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000040.

When clocks go bad: neurobehavioural consequences of disrupted circadian timing.

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  • 1Neurobehavioural Genetics Group, Medical Research Council Mammalian Genetics Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Progress in unravelling the cellular and molecular basis of mammalian circadian regulation over the past decade has provided us with new avenues through which we can explore central nervous system disease. Deteriorations in measurable circadian output parameters, such as sleep/wake deficits and dysregulation of circulating hormone levels, are common features of most central nervous system disorders. At the core of the mammalian circadian system is a complex of molecular oscillations within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. These oscillations are modifiable by afferent signals from the environment, and integrated signals are subsequently conveyed to remote central neural circuits where specific output rhythms are regulated. Mutations in circadian genes in mice can disturb both molecular oscillations and measurable output rhythms. Moreover, systematic analysis of these mutants indicates that they can express an array of abnormal behavioural phenotypes that are intermediate signatures of central nervous system disorders. Furthermore, the response of these mutants to psychoactive drugs suggests that clock genes can modify a number of the brain's critical neurotransmitter systems. This evidence has led to promising investigations into clock gene polymorphisms in psychiatric disease. Preliminary indications favour the systematic investigation of the contribution of circadian genes to central nervous system disease.

PMID:
18516223
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2295261
Free PMC Article

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