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Br J Pharmacol. 2008 Aug;154(8):1680-90. doi: 10.1038/bjp.2008.213. Epub 2008 Jun 2.

Regulation of two-pore-domain (K2P) potassium leak channels by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein.

Author information

  • 1Department of Cardiology, Medical University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels mediate potassium background (or 'leak') currents, controlling excitability by stabilizing membrane potential below firing threshold and expediting repolarization. Inhibition of K2P currents permits membrane potential depolarization and excitation. As expected for key regulators of excitability, leak channels are under tight control from a plethora of stimuli. Recently, signalling via protein tyrosine kinases (TKs) has been implicated in ion channel modulation. The objective of this study was to investigate TK regulation of K2P channels.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH:

The two-electrode voltage clamp technique was used to record K2P currents in Xenopus oocytes. In addition, K2P channels were studied in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using the whole-cell patch clamp technique.

KEY RESULTS:

Here, we report inhibition of human K2P3.1 (TASK-1) currents by the TK antagonist, genistein, in Xenopus oocytes (IC50=10.7 microM) and in CHO cells (IC50=12.3 microM). The underlying molecular mechanism was studied in detail. hK2P3.1 was not affected by genistin, an inactive analogue of genistein. Perorthovanadate, an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase activity, reduced the inhibitory effect of genistein. Current reduction was voltage independent and did not require channel protonation at position H98 or phosphorylation at the single TK phosphorylation site, Y323. Among functional hK2P family members, genistein also reduced K2P6.1 (TWIK-2), K2P9.1 (TASK-3) and K2P13.1 (THIK-1) currents, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Modulation of K2P channels by the TK inhibitor, genistein, represents a novel molecular mechanism to alter background K+ currents.

PMID:
18516069
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2518462
Free PMC Article

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