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Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2008 Aug;66(2):283-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2008.03207.x. Epub 2008 Apr 21.

Dose-effect study of domperidone as a galactagogue in preterm mothers with insufficient milk supply, and its transfer into milk.

Author information

  • 1Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology Unit, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.

Abstract

AIMS:

To investigate the possibility of a dose-response relationship for the use of domperidone in treating insufficient milk supply in mothers of preterm infants, and to quantify the exposure of the breastfed infant to domperidone.

METHODS:

Six preterm mothers received domperidone (30 mg daily or 60 mg daily) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial. Milk production and serum prolactin were measured before and during the trial, and domperidone concentration in milk was measured during drug treatment.

RESULTS:

For milk production, two of the mothers were 'nonresponders', whereas the other four were 'responders' and showed a significant increase in milk production from 8.7 +/- 3.1 g h(-1) in the run-in phase (mean +/- SEM), 23.6 +/- 3.9 g h(-1) for the 30-mg dose (P = 0.0217) and 29.4 +/- 6.6 g h(-1) for the 60-mg dose (P = 0.0047). In all participants, serum prolactin was significantly increased for both doses, but the response was not dose dependent. Median (interquartile range) domperidone concentrations in milk over a dose interval at steady-state were 0.28 microg l(-1) (0.24-0.43) and 0.49 microg l(-1) (0.33-0.72) for the 30-mg and 60-mg doses, respectively. The mean relative infant dose was 0.012% at 30 mg daily and 0.009% at 60 mg daily.

CONCLUSION:

In one-third of mothers, domperidone did not increase milk production. In the remainder, milk production increased at both domperidone doses, and there was a trend for a dose-response relationship. The amount of domperidone that transfers into milk was extremely low, and infant exposure via breastfeeding was not considered to be significant.

PMID:
18507654
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2492930
Free PMC Article

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