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J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2008 Jun;51(3):669-87. doi: 10.1044/1092-4388(2008/048).

Late childhood stuttering.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, England. p.howell@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

PURPOSE:

A study was conducted that examined factors that lead children who stutter at around age 8 years to persist in the disorder when they reach age 12 years.

METHOD:

Seventy-six children were verified to be stuttering at initial assessment. When they reached 12 years of age, they were classified as persistent or recovered. A range of measures was taken at the 2 age points, and measures were examined by recovery group.

RESULTS:

Although the tendency for more males than females to stutter was confirmed, the reasons for this tendency are not apparent for these speakers. Different patterns in speech were observed: Severity ratings of the recovered speakers dropped by age 12+. The severity ratings for the persistent speakers remained high at 12+, and dysfluency types tended to change from whole words to part words. Persistent and recovered speakers differed on temperamental performance at around age 8 years and performed differently on sensory and motor tasks at age 12+ years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Stuttering in late childhood affects mainly males. The later a child attends clinic, the longer he or she will stutter. Speech patterns of children who persist diverge from those who recover or who are fluent. As speakers persist, there are temperamental, sensory, and motor changes.

PMID:
18506043
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2405819
Free PMC Article
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