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Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Jul;18(7):572-8. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2008.03.003. Epub 2008 May 27.

The polymorphism of XRCC3 codon 241 and AFB1-related hepatocellular carcinoma in Guangxi population, China.

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  • 1Department of Pathology, Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities, Baise, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. xiaolonglong200166@yahoo.com.cn

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The relationship between aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) exposure and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been previously demonstrated and supported with strong epidemiological evidence. However, the role of genetic polymorphism of X-ray cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) codon 241 (namely: Thr241Met), which may be involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks caused by carcinogens such as AFB1, been less well elaborated.

METHODS:

We conducted a case-control study including 491 cases and 862 controls to evaluate the associations between this polymorphism and HCC risk for Guangxi population by means of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

RESULTS:

We found that individuals with the XRCC3 genotypes with codon 241 Met (namely XRCC3-TM or XRCC3-MM) had an increased risk of HCC than those with the homozygote of XRCC3 codon 241 Thr alleles (namely XRCC3-TT, adjusted odds ratios 2.22 and 7.19; 95% confidence intervals 1.72-2.88 and 4.52-11.42, respectively). The risk of HCC, moreover, did appear to differ more significantly among individuals featuring high-level AFB1-DNA adducts, whose adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 11.59 (5.73-23.47) and 37.54 (16.32-86.32), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support the hypothesis that the XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphism may be associated with the risk of AFB1-related HCC among the Guangxi population.

PMID:
18504145
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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