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Am J Prev Med. 2008 Jun;34(6):455-62. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.01.031.

U.S. Healthcare personnel and influenza vaccination during the 2004-2005 vaccine shortage.

Author information

  • 1Epidemic Intelligence Service, Office of Workforce and Career Development, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. SLorick@cdc.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Healthcare personnel with direct patient contact were prioritized for influenza vaccination during the 2004-2005 vaccine shortage. Data about vaccination coverage among healthcare personnel during vaccine shortages are limited.

METHODS:

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2005 data were analyzed in 2007 for a sample of healthcare facility workers (HCFW) aged 18-64 with (n=3456) and without (n=1153) direct patient contact and non-HCFWs (n=39,405). Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with influenza vaccination among HCFWs and to compare HCFWs with non-HCFWs with regard to the main reason for nonvaccination during the shortage.

RESULTS:

Vaccination coverage was 37% (SE +/- 3.1) among HCFWs with direct patient contact and 25% (SE +/- 5.7) among those without. In multivariate analysis, coverage was higher among HCFWs who were older, more educated, and with higher incomes and better access to health care. The reason most commonly reported by HCFWs and non-HCFWs for nonvaccination was the belief that they did not need vaccination (35% versus 40%, respectively; p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Even in a time of influenza-vaccine shortage, when most healthcare personnel were targeted for vaccination, their uptake of the vaccine remained suboptimal. Continued efforts are needed to develop effective interventions to improve the use of influenza vaccination among healthcare workers.

PMID:
18471580
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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