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J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 May;19(2):493-9. doi: 10.1353/hpu.0.0015.

The contribution of international medical graduates to diversity in the U.S. physician workforce: graduate medical education.

Author information

  • 1Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. jnorcini@faimer.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the ethnicity/race and gender distribution of the international medical graduates (IMGs) qualified to enter graduate medical education (GME) and those who are actually in GME.

METHODS:

The Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) database and the American Medical Association's Masterfile provided ethnicity/race and gender data for the pool of IMGs qualified to enter GME (ECFMG certificants from 2000-2005) and those in GME in 2005. Data for U.S. medical graduates come from Association of American Medical Colleges' publications.

RESULTS:

Compared with USMGs, both the pool of available IMGs and those in graduate training have a larger percentage of Asians and Hispanics, a lower percentage of Blacks and American Indian/Pacific Islanders, and a much lower percentage of Whites. The groups had comparable percentages of women.

CONCLUSIONS:

International medical graduates provide much-needed diversity in GME. Since most IMGs remain in the U.S. after training, this diversity can lead to a richer training environment, increased access to health care, and better health care outcomes.

Comment in

PMID:
18469420
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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