Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Surg Res. 2008 Oct;149(2):192-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2007.09.016. Epub 2007 Oct 15.

Platelet dynamics in the early phase of postischemic liver in vivo.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Advanced Biomedical Applications, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan. nokochi3@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In liver surgery, ischemia/reperfusion injury occasionally leads to liver failure by activating Kupffer cells (KCs) and leukocytes. However, few reports have demonstrated a relationship between KCs and platelets in vivo. This study investigated the relationship between these cells using intravital microscopy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (1) KC+ group, receiving 1 mL saline; and (2) KC- group, intravenously injected with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene disphosphonate for elimination of KCs. At 48 h after administration, 20 min of total normothermic hepatic ischemia was induced. Rhodamine-6G-labeled platelets and sinusoidal alterations were monitored using intravital microscopy up to 120 min after reperfusion. P-selectin, accumulated leukocytes and morphological damage, and alanine aminotransferase were evaluated.

RESULTS:

In the KC+ group, numbers of adherent platelets increased significantly within 30 min after reperfusion. Endothelial cells of sinusoids in which KCs were mainly located were destroyed and the sinusoids were significantly constricted after reperfusion. Conversely, in the KC- group, adherent platelets in sinusoids were suppressed, and sinusoidal perfusion, endothelial cell damage and serum alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly improved. P-selectin on sinusoidal endothelial cells was not observed up to 120 min after reperfusion in either group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adherent platelets appear to reflect activation of KCs and lead to leukocyte accumulation, resulting in sinusoidal perfusion disturbance and liver failure. Evaluation of adherent platelets in the microcirculation offers an important marker of hepatic injury.

PMID:
18468625
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk