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Occup Med (Lond). 2008 Aug;58(5):361-6. doi: 10.1093/occmed/kqn045. Epub 2008 May 7.

Experience of workplace violence during medical speciality training in Turkey.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public Health, Firat University Medical Faculty, Elazig, Turkey. yacik@firat.edu.tr

Abstract

AIMS:

To determine the type, extent and effects of workplace violence among residents during postgraduate speciality training in various departments of medical schools in Turkey.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey was conducted in seven medical schools representing all geographical regions of Turkey. All physicians in speciality training in the selected medical schools were asked to complete a semi-structured 'violence questionnaire' addressing the type (emotional, physical and sexual) and extent of violence experienced, the perpetrators of the violence and the victim's reactions to the experience.

RESULTS:

A total of 1712 residents out of 2442 completed the questionnaire. In all, 68% indicated they had experienced some form of workplace violence, 67% had experienced verbal violence, 16% had experienced physical violence and 3% had experienced sexual violence. The victims' most prevalent reactions to violence included being deeply disturbed but feeling they had to cope with it for the sake of their career (39%), being distressed (26%) but considering that such events are common in all occupations and discounting it and being confused and bewildered and unsure how to respond (19%). The most frequently named perpetrators of verbal violence were relatives/friends of patients (36%) and academic staff (36%), followed by other residents/senior residents (21%), patients (20%), heads of department (13%) and non-medical hospital staff (6%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Physicians in speciality training in medical schools in Turkey are subject to significant verbal, physical or sexual violence. Precautions to prevent such exposure are urgently needed.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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