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Neuron. 2008 May 8;58(3):429-41. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2008.03.027.

Transient induced gamma-band response in EEG as a manifestation of miniature saccades.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91905, Israel. shlomit.greenberg@mail.huji.ac.il

Abstract

The induced gamma-band EEG response (iGBR) recorded on the scalp is widely assumed to reflect synchronous neural oscillation associated with object representation, attention, memory, and consciousness. The most commonly reported EEG iGBR is a broadband transient increase in power at the gamma range approximately 200-300 ms following stimulus onset. A conspicuous feature of this iGBR is the trial-to-trial poststimulus latency variability, which has been insufficiently addressed. Here, we show, using single-trial analysis of concomitant EEG and eye tracking, that this iGBR is tightly time locked to the onset of involuntary miniature eye movements and reflects a saccadic "spike potential." The time course of the iGBR is related to an increase in the rate of saccades following a period of poststimulus saccadic inhibition. Thus, whereas neuronal gamma-band oscillations were shown conclusively with other methods, the broadband transient iGBR recorded by scalp EEG reflects properties of miniature saccade dynamics rather than neuronal oscillations.

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PMID:
18466752
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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