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Acta Paediatr. 2008 Jul;97(7):977-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2008.00831.x. Epub 2008 May 2.

Television viewing associates with delayed language development.

Author information

  • 1Division of Growth and Development, Department of Pediatrics, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Abstract

AIM:

To identify impact of television viewing on language development.

METHODS:

The case-control study included 56 new patients with language delay and 110 normal children, aged 15-48 months. Language delay was diagnosed by reviewing language milestones and Denver-II. Television viewing variables and child/parental characteristics between both groups were interviewed. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and chi-square test. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated from multivariate logistic regression model.

RESULTS:

Forty-six boys and 10 girls; mean [+/-SD] age, 2.11+/-0.47 years of the case group and 59 boys and 51 girls; mean [+/-SD] age, 2.23+/-0.80 years of the control group were enrolled. Children who had language delay usually started watching television earlier at age 7.22+/-5.52 months vs. 11.92+/-5.86 months, p-value<0.001 and also spent more time watching television than normal children (3.05+/-1.90 h/day vs. 1.85+/-1.18 h/day; p-value<0.001). Children who started watching television at<12 months of age and watched television>2 h/day were approximately six times more likely to have language delays.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is a relationship between early onset and high frequency of TV viewing and language delay.

PMID:
18460044
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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