Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 Aug;122(2):261-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2008.03.027. Epub 2008 Apr 25.

Antimicrobial peptides and the skin immune defense system.

Author information

  • 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

Our skin is constantly challenged by microbes but is rarely infected. Cutaneous production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is a primary system for protection, and expression of some AMPs further increases in response to microbial invasion. Cathelicidins are unique AMPs that protect the skin through 2 distinct pathways: (1) direct antimicrobial activity and (2) initiation of a host response resulting in cytokine release, inflammation, angiogenesis, and reepithelialization. Cathelicidin dysfunction emerges as a central factor in the pathogenesis of several cutaneous diseases, including atopic dermatitis, in which cathelicidin is suppressed; rosacea, in which cathelicidin peptides are abnormally processed to forms that induce inflammation; and psoriasis, in which cathelicidin peptide converts self-DNA to a potent stimulus in an autoinflammatory cascade. Recent work identified vitamin D3 as a major factor involved in the regulation of cathelicidin. Therapies targeting control of cathelicidin and other AMPs might provide new approaches in the management of infectious and inflammatory skin diseases.

PMID:
18439663
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2639779
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

FIG 1
FIG 2
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk