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Eur J Heart Fail. 2008 May;10(5):454-62. doi: 10.1016/j.ejheart.2008.03.017. Epub 2008 Apr 24.

Transplantation of adipose derived stromal cells is associated with functional improvement in a rat model of chronic myocardial infarction.

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  • 1Hematology and Cell Therapy and Foundation for Applied Medical Research, Division of Cancer, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

Abstract

AIMS:

To determine the effect of transplantation of undifferentiated and cardiac pre-differentiated adipose stem cells compared with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) in a chronic model of myocardial infarction.

METHODS:

Ninety-five Sprague-Dawley rats underwent left coronary artery ligation and after 1 month received by direct intramyocardial injection either adipose derived stem cells (ADSC), cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) or BM-MNC from enhanced-Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) mice. The control group was treated with culture medium. Heart function was assessed by echocardiography and 18F-FDG microPET. Cell engraftment, differentiation, angiogenesis and fibrosis in the scar tissue were also evaluated by (immuno)histochemistry and immunofluorescence.

RESULTS:

One month after cell transplantation, ADSC induced a significant improvement in heart function (LVEF 46.3+/-9.6% versus 27.7+/-8% pre-transplant) and tissue viability (64.78+/-7.2% versus 55.89+/-6.3% pre-transplant). An increase in the degree of angiogenesis and a decrease in fibrosis were also detected. Although transplantation of AD-CMG or BM-MNC also had a positive, albeit smaller, effect on angiogenesis and fibrosis in the infarcted hearts, this benefit did not translate into a significant improvement in heart function or tissue viability.

CONCLUSION:

These results indicate that transplantation of adipose derived cells in chronic infarct provides a superior benefit to cardiac pre-differentiated ADSC and BM-MNC.

PMID:
18436478
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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