Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Jun;47(6):662-72. doi: 10.1097/CHI.0b013e31816bff88.

Co-occurrence of motor problems and autistic symptoms in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry Box 8134, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110-1093, USA. reiersea@psychiatry.wustl.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the relation between parent reports of motor problems and clinically significant autistic symptoms in children with and without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

METHOD:

Subjects were male (n = 521) and female (n = 330) twins from an epidemiological study of ADHD, ages 7 to 19 years at assessment using the Child Behavior Checklist and semistructured psychiatric diagnostic interviews. Parent-rated Social Responsiveness Scale questionnaires were returned for 62% of 1,647 individuals who participated in interviews. After exclusion of subjects with incomplete data or evidence of mental retardation, 851 subjects (52%) were available for the present study analysis. Each subject was classified by DSM-IV ADHD subtype and assigned to one of seven population-defined ADHD subtypes based on latent class analysis of DSM-IV ADHD symptoms. Within each ADHD subtype, we examined the relation between Child Behavior Checklist motor problem endorsement and elevated autistic symptoms on the Social Responsiveness Scale.

RESULTS:

Motor problems and high levels of autistic traits were most common in individuals with combined-type ADHD. Within each of the clinically relevant DSM-IV and latent class ADHD subtypes, individuals with the combination of motor problems and ADHD were more likely to have high levels of autistic traits than those with ADHD alone.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with the combination of ADHD and parent-reported motor coordination deficits have elevated levels of autistic symptoms. Targeted treatment and prevention interventions may be warranted. The exclusion criteria for DSM-IV ADHD should be revised to reflect these population-based findings.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk