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Annu Rev Microbiol. 2008;62:71-92. doi: 10.1146/annurev.micro.62.081307.163005.

Global spread and persistence of dengue.

Author information

  • 1Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, and Graduate Group in Microbiology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7354, USA. jennkyle@berkeley.edu

Abstract

Dengue is a spectrum of disease caused by four serotypes of the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus affecting humans today, and its incidence has increased dramatically in the past 50 years. Due in part to population growth and uncontrolled urbanization in tropical and subtropical countries, breeding sites for the mosquitoes that transmit dengue virus have proliferated, and successful vector control has proven problematic. Dengue viruses have evolved rapidly as they have spread worldwide, and genotypes associated with increased virulence have expanded from South and Southeast Asia into the Pacific and the Americas. This review explores the human, mosquito, and viral factors that contribute to the global spread and persistence of dengue, as well as the interaction between the three spheres, in the context of ecological and climate changes. What is known, as well as gaps in knowledge, is emphasized in light of future prospects for control and prevention of this pandemic disease.

PMID:
18429680
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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